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Ask Cubby’ Category

ASK Cubby

“review
Hi I would love to see a review of the new 1/5 VRX phantom-B brushless buggy
Mmmmm”

Cubby- Hey ya “Mmmmm”, shoot us your snail mail for the hook-up on a BigSquidRC sticker pack.

So… you would like to see a review of the VRX Phantom 1/5 buggy? Why? Have you seen that thing? It looks like something Iron Mike picked out of his nose, and having seen first hand some of the things that come out of there, that is some pretty gruesome stuff.

But seriously… some of the smaller 1/10 VRX products don’t look bad, but the buggy you mention would make Medusa wince in agony. Oh and… I have no clue if the buggy is any good or not, however I would never review one based on looks alone.


“Hi Cubby,
Back in Apr 21, 2014, you mentioned a third rc company coming out with a 1/8 scale gas monster truck. Haven’t heard any news. Btw, how come there’s no rc companies coming out with a gas powered truck with reverse transmission? Thank you! :)
Harry Y.”

Cubby- Heyyyyyy now Harry, thanks for the email and congrats, you’ve just won a free sticker pack.

Yes, I have first hand knowledge of a third gas entry, but…

Before the HPI Octane the Losi XXL-2 hit the market, several companies were scrambling to get into the gas game. However… after the cold reception they both received, companies don’t seem to be in such a rush. Gas will no doubt be big at some point in the future, and while I feel that both the Octane and the XXL-2 were admirable first attempts at the category, there is still a lot of room for improvement. From my first hand knowledge with “Company X” that is working on a gas 1/8th scaler, they are taking their time to make sure their product is as refined as possible before hitting the market, which might be months, or even years from now.

Btw… where are the aftermarket parts for the gas trucks put out thus far? I know the aftermarket types out there, they could fix any/all that ills those trucks, but so far they have sat on their hands. “Sighhhhh”

Anywhos…

And why no reverse on the gas trucks so far? Cost, plain and simple. Both of the current models came to the plate at relatively high price points, to add reverse would simply push them that much further out of the realm of most people’s budgets.


That’s it ya lunatics, shoot me an email and maybe, just maybe, you too can bask in the glory of making it into ASK Cubby. Cubby at BigSquidRC dot com is the address, should you make the big time you will get a free sticker pack or possibly even a t-shirt!

YOUR Cub Reporter

ASK Cubby

“QUESTION FOR CUBBY
Dear Cubby;
I’m a speed and bash rc truck person – slash and savage, etc. – but I really like the looks of some of the crawlers. And was wondering if anyone has had any luck modifying a crawler for speed and bashing. I realize they have a high center of gravity but I thought the wide stance and large tires might welcome a brushless system and performance oriented shocks. Your thoughts?
Blessings
Damon H.
San Rafael, CA
Ps. This is in fact the first time in my life I have ever had the privilege of consulting someone named “Cubby.””

Cubby- Hey ya Damon from California, thanks for the letter, shoot us your snail mail so we can totally hook you up with a BSRC sticker pack.

So… you want to mod-out a crawler and make it go really, really fast. Hey, I dig that idea. Throwing on some foams, a huge pinion, and a 6S 7700kV power system in an Axial SCX10 just sounds gnarly to me. If you do it, be sure and send us pics/vid because even I can’t wait to see one of those doing 60 mph speed passes.

However… I would recommend you simply pick up one of the new Axial Yetis. From getting in a bunch of time driving the Yeti, I have found it is a perfect vehicle for doing some light crawling, while also having the ability to do 40 mph speed runs and hit’n big jumps. It has the uber scale looks that you would expect from an Axial product, and performs like nothing else on the market. Oh and… from speaking to the Axial crew a couple days ago, they expect for them to start hitting consumer hands in about two weeks, get your order in now if you want one.


“Looking for a Rally Car
With so many rally cars out there, Which is the best onroad basher and light gravel machine? Looking to keep it scale or have the option for a scaled body. Subaru is a plus.
-Shane H.”

Cubby- Yo hey Shane, congrats on making the big time, don’t forget we can’t hook ya up with stickers unless you send us your snail mail.

To your question… it has been some time since we did our Rally Car Shootout, but it is still quite relevant today. For purely on-road use, I am personally a big fan of the HPI WR8 Flux. Compared to the others in its class, it has loads of power and handles very well on pavement. However, you may not be a big fan of its Ken Block/Ford livery.

For a Subaru fan such as yourself, the Kyosho DRX VE Impreza would also be a good choice. The Kyosho isn’t as good on pavement as the HPI, nor does it have as much raw power, but it still drives well on-road, and still has a solid amount of brushless power. Also of note on the Kyosho, its body is absolutely top-notch, and it handles off-road better than pretty much any other dedicated rally car on the market.

Make the decision, cut the check, insert Hugeeee smile on face.


That’s it for this week ya mongrels, shoot your letters/comments/rants/questions to Cubby at BigSquidRC dot com. If (and I highly doubt it will) your letter hits the big time you’ll win a BSRC sticker pack or maybe even one of our new t-shirts!

YOUR Cub Reporter

ASK Cubby

“Family room runner

I’m fairly green when it comes to rc cars and the like and was hoping for a bit of advise on a new rc car. I am wanting something that I can run around inside my family room, plus a bit of outside patio if the desire comes to me. I already have a Losi micro T and was looking for something a bit larger and easier to tinker with. I like the looks of the Losi mini 8ight. It may be too big and fast, but comes well equipped and I may be able to gear down. The other rig I am digging on is the Associated SC18. I like the looks and the size, but am worried about the belt drive issue. I’d like to stay away from stuff that has a two-in-one ESC/receiver like the micro T. Brushless power would be nice for longer run time and power. Local parts support isn’t an issue, my local shop is a bit lackluster and I tend to have to order things online. I like to tinker as much as drive, sometimes more. Any advice would be appreciated.

Josh K.
NorCal”

Cubby- Yo congrats Josh K, you’ve just pulled off a coveted “Letter of the Month”. Shoot us your snail mail (and your shirt size) so we can hook you up with one of our spank’n new t-shirts.

As far as your question goes, I just happen to be an expert on what to run in a living room (as well as pretty much every other topic on this planet). Seriously, every winter I invite my homeskillets over and we hold our own RC Supercross before the AMA night program kicks off live on tv. What have I learned????

18th scalers are typically too big and too fast. This results in multiple tire marks up on the wall that the wife does NOT appreciate. I’ve found the perfect sized vehicle for my RC Supercross room (18 x 20′) to be the Losi Micro SCT. The SCT version is significantly larger than the Micro-T truck, plus it’s 4wd which makes for easier adjustments over the big triples we make out of rugs with boxes underneath. Standard oil shocks on the SCT makes passes through the whoop section a blast, instead of a pogo experiment like what you would have with a Micro-T. Also, we’ve run them (the Micro SCTs) on BL, but that makes them a bit too fast (read- more tire marks on the walls and furniture) so we run ours on brushed motors with LiPo batteries. For my room that is the perfect set-up.

If you really and truly want to go up a size from the Micro SCT, I’d recommend the Dromida line-up of vehicles. They are the same size as the AE 18th scalers and are tough and affordable, two things you want for a Man-Cave machine. The Losi Mini 8IGHT buggy you mention is a kick ass machine as well, but I have driven one in my Supercross room and you don’t want to (unless you are good at repairing drywall and/or ceilings).


“Review Mini Losi 8ight-T

Good night,

How are you? Please, I need a information.I would like buy a Losi 1/14, but i have a doubt, what`s the better: mini 8ight or mini 8ight T? Are there difference in top speed between this rc cars? Which is your favourite? What is the stronger? Can I change the spur gear of the both cars for reach top speed? thanks!!!

Thanks,
Haroldo O.”

Cubby- Ya know Haroldo, out of the thousands of emails I’ve received over the years, yours is the first one to actually ask me how I am doing. Thanks, and welcome to the big time, shoot us your snail mail so we can get ya a big ole’ BSRC sticker pack.

So how am I doing? Not worth a dern really. The rc industry is in a lull, my 550 has a cracked bell housing (read- $$$$$), and Iron Mike just got me back on our ongoing CA glue war (crafty fellow- he put several drops on the outside of the bottle I was using to glue up some tires). But seriously, who am I kidding? I have the best job in the world- destroying and complaining about toy cars. So ya, I am actually doing pretty damn awesome.

Oh ya, you had an rc question…

So… between the Losi Mini 8IGHT buggy and the 8IGHT-T truggy, which one is faster, which one is stronger, and which one do I prefer?

Which one is faster? Both are crazy quick, the top speed is up to you. Want more top end? Simply add a couple teeth to the pinion. Want stupid power? Pop in a 3S LiPo. IMO, both are easily overpowered.

Which one is tougher? Once again, they are pretty close. Both have proven quite durable for us.

Which one do I prefer? Both. The buggy is better for smaller or smoother areas, it is more agile than the Mini 8IGHT-T. The truggy is better for larger and/or rougher areas. However… if I had to pick just one I’d go with the 8IGHT-T because I consider it slightly more versatile. Because of its size, the truggy simply handles better in a bunch of rough areas that I normally drive at (like 8th scale buggy tracks or in bumpy open fields). The fact that a plethora of normal 10th scale buggy tires fit on the truggy is just icing on the cake.


So that’s it for this week, shoot me your letters, spam, and perfect condition Ferrari bell housings to Cubby at BigSquidRC.com. If your letter/question makes the big time you’ll win some stickers, if I proclaim yours as “Letter of the Month” you’ll get a free t-shirt.

YOUR Cub Reporter

ASK Cubby

“Vaterra Halix Build

What’s the deal with the Vaterra Halix build? You left me hanging. I was following that build step by step (although I installed the Vaterra CVDs instead of the MIPs.) I figured you guys had gotten busy with the trade show and had put the build on hold, but that’s well in the past. Is the Halix build going to be finished? In addition to the shocks, tires, and CVDs, I installed Robinson Racing’s new Halix Slipper unit. There was a DRAMATIC difference! I’ve ordered another one to install on my Vaterra Raptor. The last piece to complete my Halix is a crazy ESC/Motor. I’d really like your guys’ input on that and any gearing changes if need be.

Thanks.

Dave F.”

Cubby- Yo hey Dave, shoot us your snail mail so we can get ya a BSRC sticker pack for that Halix of yours.

What’s the dealio with our Vaterra Halix build? Yes, more is still in the works. And yes, we’ve just been crazy slammed around the office. I’ll crack some whips around here and see if I can get someone to bust out some more articles on the Halix.

We have been driving it hard (read- abusing it) and have had very few issues with it after some simple mods. We ran it last weekend at a big bash in the freestyle contest and once again it came home in one piece. We have slicked off a few of the stock 48 pitch spur gears though, the Robinson slipper you installed converts over to 32 pitch to take more of a beating.


“big fan of your site. quick question for you sir.
Here is a pic of someones HPI XL octane.

HPI Savage Octane Any chance you can tell me the company that makes those exact rims and also the tires for this car??? Love the way it looks and wish to purchase.

Thanks for your time :)

Johnathan G.”

Cubby- Hey now Johnny G, thanks for the email.

That pic you attached was from one of the first consumers on the planet to get the HPI Savage Octane, David F. And yes, both you and David have good taste in wheels/tires. The ones in the picture are from the good guys over at Pro-Line. The tires are Big Joe IIs mounted up on F-11 3.8″ wheels (find more info Right Here). Expect a set of four pre-mounts to set ya back around 90 clams. We’ve run that wheel/tire combo a lot on various monster trucks and it’s a primo set-up for when you run on multiple surfaces like grass, then asphalt, then dirt.

You’re welcome and all my answer costs you is an Excalibur collection Roger Dubuis. What a small price to pay for such an excellent answer. Feel free to mail the watch to my home address at your convenience. :)


You have made it to the end of yet another ASK Cubby. Why not submit your own question/rant/meltdown/resume? The email addy you want is Cubby at BigSquidRC.com. I will be picking a “letter of the month” winner next week, so get to peck’n at that keyboard of yours.

YOUR Cub Reporter

ASK Cubby

“U guys should make a video with a ton of rc cars and have a race
From Michael J on his iPod”

Cubby- Yo Mikey J on your iPod, thanks for shoot’n me an email.

So… you want us to make a video with exactly one ton of rc cars racing. Ok, I’ll entertain the idea, so lets do some math.

Let’s assume that the average weight of each vehicle is 5 lbs. I pick that number not only be it is somewhat round, but also because it would probably be in the ballpark. A “standard” short ton is 2000 pounds, so 2000 divided by 5 is 400. I have to say Mikey I likey your style, I would also like to see a video with 400 cars all driving/racing at the exact same time. But… sadly, no matter how cool it would be, there would be a few issues to overcome…

Drivers- we would need 400 of them, which might be a little hard to get in one place at one time.

Radios- To get 400 different channels might be a bit hard. For example, only 79 different Spektrum radios can operate at one time, so even if you throw in Futaba FASST, old school 27 and 75, and several other brands, I’m still not sure we could come up with 400 separate working systems.

Space- Unless we were shooting for just a full on demo derby, it is gonna get pretty sketchy running 400 cars at once.

My solution? One driver with one transmitter and 400 cars bound to it. Put them all in a row, punch the throttle, and let the fun begin. But that is just how I’m wired…


“RC Radios

Saw Graupner X-8N and X-8E online on your website you mentioned didn’t know when or if it would be available in U.S or CANADA that was in 2013 any further info on them now

Bullet Bill”

Cubby- Hey now Bullet Bill, thanks for the email and be sure to shoot us your snail mail so we can totally get you dialed with a BigSquidRC sticker set.

Ya, we got our first chance to check out the new Graupner stuff a couple weeks ago at the HobbyTown USA Convention in Lincoln Nebraska. While I was not personally a big fan of their radio systems, their “computer tower” style chargers looked boss.

Anyways… I have some good news for ya BB, the good folks over at Tower Hobbies have picked up the Graupner line. They aren’t in stock yet, but should be soon.


That’s it ya lunatics, why don’t ya get crazy and shoot me an email, Cubby at BigSquidRC.com. If your letter/question/rant makes the big time you’ll win something cool enough to brag about to your friends. That is all.

YOUR Cub Reporter

ASK Cubby

“Child’s Crawler
I am looking to get my 2 kids a crawler each I will also be buying 1 for myself. I was thinking a small one for them and a 1/10th for myself. Since I will be buying 3 price is a bit of a concern. Right now I have a Losi xxx-t but Losi`s have gotten hard to find locally so that is something to consider also.
Any advice will be great
Thanks,
Josh A.”

Cubby- Yo to the yo Josh, thanks for the email.

So you wanna get into the crawling scene with your kids, not spend much cash, and might want to stay away from Losi due to the parts availability where you live.

First off props for thinking to buy your kids some trucks to get them involved with the hobby. Good for you, the future of our fine hobby depends on them.

You didn’t say if you’ll be doing actual crawling or just doing general bashing with the new crawlers, so I’ll just wing my answer like I always do.

I wouldn’t buy them a smaller sized crawler than the one you get and here’s why- size matters more than anything else out in the rocks. A section where a 2.2 truck might blow through without issue, a smaller truck can get stuck on the first rock. It would suck to be out crawling/trailing and either have to only do easy sections so your kids small trucks could make it, or have every section where your 2.2 made it no problem but they were constantly getting hung up. I have been on several expeditions involving vastly different sized trail machines, and someone is always getting screwed over by the type of terrain. Running the same size at least makes it the equally hard (or easy) for all involved.

So like I said earlier, size matters in the rocks, so that’s why I would recommend a truck using 2.2 tires for you and your crew. And… because you are wanting to stay away from Losi, I would recommend Axial. Axial has a couple big advantages right now. First off, because of their vast popularity, many local hobby shops are keeping parts for them on the shelves (some shops even more than Traxxas, Gasp!). Two- they are relatively affordable. They aren’t the cheapest out on the market, but they are not near the upper end of price range for the genre either.

If you don’t want to spend the cash for three 2.2 sized Axials, here is an idea. Because runtime is so insanely long on a crawler, you might just want to pick up one or two to start with. This way you can find out for sure if you and your kids are into the crawling scene, and with the insane runtimes one pack will probably be long enough for you and your kids to get an rc fix before having to switch out a pack.

Btw, as far as 2.2 Axial’s go, I’m a fan of the Deadbolt. It has decent speed for a crawler, plus it comes with 2.2 tires that have a good tread for general use. And oh ya, it can wheelie, which kids love to do.

Go fast, spin tires, and shoot us pics of what you end up buying.

Hit the “Read More” button to read one of the best rants I’ve received in a while…

READ MORE

ASK Cubby

“Going Fast

Hey Cubby I hope this ends up on Big Squid. I have saved up about 40 bucks to spend on go fast parts for my Rustler. Tell me, is 40 enough to even make a difference?

Charlie T.”

Cubby- Yo what’s up Charlie. Yes, your question has made the big-time, shoot us your snail mail for a free sticker pack.

Is $40 enough to make your Rustler go faster? While some people might snicker at you, I will not. No, 40 clams, won’t make a huge difference, but it is more than enough to gain some speed.

Btw, I am going to assume you have the electric version here, if you happen to have the nitro please just beat it with a hammer until dead.

Pinion gears are a really cheap way of gaining speed on your electric Rustler. A Robinson Racing pinion for your truck only costs about $4 and can definitely gain you some rip. I would recommend picking up a couple of new pinions, one with about 2 more teeth than you currently have, and another with 4 more. The larger sized pinions will give you more top speed, but keep an eye on your motor temp to make sure you don’t get it too hot. A motor temp under 160 F is a good place to be, if you get it too hot you will ruin the magnet inside. Don’t have the cash for a temp gun? Find a cheap one. The old school spit test only lets you know after your magnet has been baked.

Oh and… while a larger pinion will gain you some top speed, you will end up losing runtime. If you were to pop on a smaller pinion, you would gain runtime but lose top end speed.

One more thing, if your truck has a brushed motor, giving it a good water dipping will also give it more power/speed.


That’s it for this week, you know the drill shoot me your questions to Cubby at BigSquidRC.com. Make the big-time get free stuff.

YOUR Cub Reporter

ASK Cubby

“Murfdogg Psycho

Guys, I would love to see a review and maybe even a head to head vs. The Proline Pro-2 with the new Murfdogg Psycho. I am just getting into the growing field of short course truck dirt oval racing, I’m running a late model style body, and am thinking about one of these two trucks for my next build. The big question is; is the Murf worth $200 more? I’m currently running a LCG Slash with a ChuckWorks mid motor conversion on the way soon. Really love the look of the Pro-2 and the reviews it has gotten but the new Psycho seems to be a strong challenger with the mid motor layout.

Thoughts?

Bryan C.”

Cubby- Yo hey Bryan, thanks for taking the time out of your day to shoot us an email. Oh ya, I have proclaimed yours as “Letter of the Month”, be sure to shoot us an email with your snail mail so we can hook you up with a BSRC t-shirt.

While we did post the PR for the Murfdogg, we have never really talked to them so I have no idea if they would be up for going head to head again the Pro-Line PRO-2. However, what I do know is the PL is a solid truck, whether it is being used for bashing, off-road, or oval. And… although the Murfdogg uses several AE parts, I would be concerned about the availability of parts for it. Not many hobby shops are gonna stock the specialty parts on that truck. If it was up to me I’d cut the check for the PL and use the extra 200 clams on uber batteries or to stock up on tires, but then that is just my opinion.


“Break too much

I read over on Facebook about how a certain website likes to throw review stuff off of roofs to bash and thrash it. Just wondering, do you think that is irresponsible?

Dayton R.”

Cubby- Heyyyy now Dayton, thanks for the email, get us your snail mail so we can get ya a sticker set in the mail.

Ya, I had multiple people shoot that to me. It was an industry person expressing their opinion that we (I can’t imagine what other website they might have been talking about, LOL) might be a bit rough on review product.

Pretty much every product we get goes off a roof at some time or another, and I’m not just talking cars here, I’m talking transmitters, batteries, etc. As I’ve always said, “We do it so you don’t have to.”. Some product is very tough and not easily broken, and because we aren’t going to stop a review before a product is broken, we have to resort to hucking them off a roof.

Is that irresponsible? Well, what we do for a living is to test rc equipment. Part of that testing is to determine if it will break the first time you drive it, or if it is the toughest product in its category. We could just beat the stuff with a hammer to determine how tough it is, but that just doesn’t have the flair or suspense of seeing whether it lives when coming off a roof.


That’s it for another ASK Cubby. Submit your questions, rants, and other verbal narcolepsy to Cubby at BigSquidRC.com. If your letter makes the big time you’ll get some free stuff in the mail.

YOUR Cub Reporter

ASK Cubby

“Pro-Line Pro-2 VS Traxxas Slash Ultimate

Alright I have a Traxxas Slash Ultimate 4×4 and I would like to get a Pro-Line Pro-2 soon. Now, I know that one of them is a 4×4 and one us a 4×2 but I would like to know which one is better for bashing, and what better people to ask than the folks at Big Squid? I have heard nothing but great things about the Pro-2. Your review of the Pro-2 was a big help but I’m wondering if it is better than my slash. Thanks!

CAMERON G.”

Cubby- YO! I thought about just leaving your answer at that (we are big fans of the app), but after a few evil eyes from Brian, I guess I must give you more of a reply.

Pretty much any 4wd has a huge advantage over a 2wd in rc, and that is the case here. Yes, the Pro-Line is a great truck, one that we drive daily, and it is our favorite 2wd SCT, but the 4wd on the TRX is a huge advantage.

4wd helps a ton in pretty much every scenario. It is a huge advantage when plowing through grass. SCTs are prone to being hard to control over jumps and 4wd goes a long ways to making them easier to fly. Etc, etc, etc. However…. there are a couple disadvantages to 4wd. They tend to not turn as tightly, so the Pro-2 can cut under the Slash 4×4 in super tight 180s. And… 4wd are much harder on electrical systems.

Should you cut the check for the Pro-2? Heck ya you should, it’s as uber of a 2wd SCT as any on the market, but don’t expect it to do everything that a 4wd can.


“ECX 4WD Front Wire

On the ECX 4WD vehicles that Front Mystery Wire is a Steering Stop. They prevent the steering block from going too far. Since there isn’t a C Hub with a stop these are needed. It took me a while to figure this out & it didn’t come to me until I was checking the servo travel.

Chris S.”

Cubby- Ya, I got “the call” from one of my homies over at Horizon about 5 minutes after our ECX Torment review went live. Using a 35 minute phone call dissertation, he completely filled me on the whys and hows of “the mystery wire”. While it isn’t the way I would have gone about it, the wire is simple, effect, and adjustable (by bending/changing).


Yo, you’ve made it all the way through another ASK Cubby, hit me with an email at Cubby at BigSquidRC.com. If you make the big time (like Chris and Cameron did this week) you’ll get a free sticker pack, or maybe even one of our uber new t-shirts.

YOUR Cub Reporter

ASK Cubby

“How come bigsquidrc.com doesn’t have?

Hey Cubby,
Why isn’t there a section on BigSquidRC.com to help out noobs like myself? I see articles saying to help us out if we’re at the track or the local bash spot, and that’s great! The problem is we don’t always know if the info we’re getting is on the money! So how about a section full of tips and tricks for the new to rc guys? Such as Li-Po care, taping and mounting tyres, general maintenance and proper cleaning tips, etc etc. I know it’d help me out being able to come to a reliable, knowledgeable site such as this one (sucking up much? I know but I could use a sticker pack!) Keep up the great work keeping us to date with the latest news and reviews.
Thanks,
Dan N.”

Cubby- Ummmmmm…. you got us Dan. I dig your idea, we do need a tab at the top of our page that just says “Noobs Click Here”.

There are already a bunch of resources on-line for noobs. Heck, there are probably 2 thousand videos on YouTube on how to glue up tires. However…. none of them are from our unique BSRC perspective (although not a video, you can check out my recent tire gluing article HERE).

So ya, I dig your idea, I’ll try and get Adam “The Intern” on it for you and for all the other noobies out there.


“What’s going on with Duratrax

Hi Cubby,
I just picked up a SCREAMING deal on a new DTX 835e roller. $107. I have been looking for a budget 1/8 RC for a while, and most of the web time on these cars is pretty good, save one issue. Parts.

I am no stranger to Duratrax. I have an Evader that I have really enjoyed. It’s brushless, and with a few modifications (TBone Racing Bumpers), it is durable and probably as bullet proof as most other RC’s . . . . they all break. Back to my 835e. I looked at Tower Hobbies and many parts are on order. On the forums, everyone gripes about parts availability The 835e seems like a flagship RC for them . . . . if you look at their website.

So what’s up with Duratrax? As much fun as I have head with the Evader, it seems like they are always shooting themselves in the foot, either selling a vehicle that requires mods which should probably come from the factory, or selling really nice vehicles but not managing their supply line.

I wish I ran that company. I would whip them into shape.
Thanks
Patrick C.”

Cubby- Congrats on making the big-time Patrick, shoot us your snail mail and we’ll rush you out a BSRC sticker pack.

So…. after skimming your letter, I guess you want to know why parts support isn’t better at Duratrax?

And the answer is…. I have no idea. I don’t work there, and the people I know that do, well, they would certainly keep all the parts in stock if they could. However… you know me, I love to speculate/talk-smack, so I’ll just do some of that.

The Duratrax 835E is/was a solid buggy. It handled decent, had nice power on tap, and could be bashed fairly hard without it breaking. In fact, it nearly won our “Bash Vehicle of the Year” last year, it’s a solid basher. However… since it came out, we haven’t heard much about it. No Duartrax upgrade parts, not much support from the aftermarket, and no new off-shoots of the platform. It seems like they brought a bunch into the states, pushed it hard for a few months, then sort of forgot about it.

Hobbico is number one for a reason, they have their act together. But even with the best of companies things can get overlooked. In the case of your buggy, they flew off dealers shelves, put up good numbers, now it sounds like they didn’t bring in enough parts for all the buggies they sold.

So.. what should you do about parts??? Well….. if you can’t get’em through the normal channels do what you just did, buy another buggy at a “Screaming” deal. If you can secure another buggy on the cheap you’ll have plenty of spare parts at very reasonable price. Otherwise, I suggest giving the folks over at Duratrax an email or phone to let’em know how much you dig your DTX products, but how you may no longer be able to support them because you can’t find replacement parts.


Ok, so I’ve probably got more time to answer letters, but due to my insanely lazy nature, I’m calling it a day. Submit your letters/questions/b!tching/complaints/rants to Cubby at BigSquidRC.com. You’ll win cool stuff if your letter hits our front page, if it doesn’t, at least you’ll know some intern scanned over it before hitting delete.

YOUR Cub Reporter

ASK Cubby

“carisma rc

Hi Cubby. First sorry for the english im live in Brazil. Lets see if you can help me again, i follow your advice and have many rcs and there are two that you help me choose when i was in doubt and im happy that i follow your advice when buy the scte and the vorza. But now i love the minis and after some months of hard work i have 600$ for rcs and was thinking of buying the carisma gt10dt and the gt16mt. But i was a little afraid, my summit 1/16 give me many problems and the losi mini 8ight of my brother when we do light bashing always break something. My summit now is just an onroad car.

So the question is this, are the two carisma minis really durable cars? I dont do 20% there you make in your videos but don’t have luck and always something breaks. Really worth buy these two minis?

Jonas T.”

Cubby- Yo hey Jonas, shoot us your snail mail address so we can get ya hooked up with a BigSquidRC sticker kit. They will instantly keep all your rc cars from breaking. (insert sarcasm tags here)

So… you are on the fence about cutting the check for a Carisma GT10DT and GT16MT. I was there for the review of both of those vehicles, and yes, they are quite durable. In fact, the GT16MT was the only test vehicle we’ve ever had here that I grew tired of trying to break. We slammed it full speed into every hard object we could find, jumped it off every roof in the neighborhood, and it was still able to drive away. For durability, I can very highly recommend it.

The GT10DT buggy was also fairly durable. It took quite a bit of slamming to get it to break. But… with you being in Brazil (where soccer madness is about to explode) you need to make sure you have easy access to parts. No matter how tough any vehicle may be, it will break at some point.


“Recomendations

I have been into RC’ing for quite some time:
(1) I have a 1994 Vintage Traxxas Nitro-Hawk and it is frustrating as H&*%L. (the small Image-12 engine is quite finicky)

(2) I wanna get into Electric – I love the stadium truck platform, I am (for some reason or another) steering toward the HPI E-Firestorm Flux

do you think this particular truck has an advantage or disadvantage over the Rustler
— or is there another RTR Stadium you would recommend over one of them..
I live in a great neighborhood for street running (city provided nice speed bumps for my pleasure) I also have decent access to Golf Course roads.
So speed (quick enough to confront a varmint or two) and light bashing (speed bumps and sand traps are calling my name) would be great,
Any input would be great,
–Thanks –

Carl D.”

Cubby- Yo hey Carl, somehow your email got forwarded to me from my ever increasing staff of interns, so it must be worth answering. Give me a second to read it…

Ok, so I didn’t actually read your email, but I did give it a light skimming. If I skimmed correctly you want to know what truck would I recommend, the HPI E-Firestorm Flux or a Traxxas Rustler VXL.

Btw, before I answer your question, I think I read something about a Nitro Hawk in your email? Hopefully you don’t own one, those things were a PITA to keep running properly.

So on to your question. To be perfectly blunt, I would recommend the HPI. Why? While it isn’t the latest in uber tech, it is a much more modern design than the Rustler. Because of that, it simply handles better, a lot better. Also, it’s a fairly tough truck. Yes, of course you can get it to break, but under “normal” use it can take some good hits without exploding like it just ran over an IED.

But…. and there is always a “but”, the Traxxas does have one outstanding feature- parts support. If you break something on the Rustler most decent hobby shops will have the parts in stock to get you going again.


That’s it for yet another week of ASK Cubby. You can attempt in vain to shoot me your questions at Cubby at BigSquidRC.com. Make it on our front page and we’ll shoot you a free sticker pack, get named as “Letter of the Week” and you’ll get a free BSRC t-shirt.

YOUR Cub Reporter

ASK Cubby

“Hey Cubby

There’s alot of good cars around now, I’m trying to pick something for big air on hard surfaces, have a few good skateparks & a BMX track near by. I can’t decide between a 1/8 MT4 or Savage, or a Firestorm, Rustler or Granite something that’s lighter & cheaper so can launch it with blatant disregard!

I’ve had alot of cars but am going in circle on this, what would you go for with these kamakaze jumps in mind?

Keep on pushing the limits! Love it!

Thanks,

Alan K.”

Cubby- Yo hey Alan, big props for the love. Congrats, I proclaim yours as the “Letter of the Month”, shoot us your snail mail so we can hook ya up with a t-shirt and sticker pack.

Ok, so you are looking to do some high flying skate park action and want to know what to buy. First off, in case you’ve never done much skate park bashing, those places are hell on rc trucks. Seriously, IMO they are harder on parts than any other venue, so expect to break loads of parts, regardless of how “tough” the truck is.

With that said… this is what you want in a skate park truck-

1. A truck that already has parts on the pegs at your LHS. This is just common sense.

2. Big tires. Big tires will help you three ways at a skate park. First- they help absorb hard landings. Second- they help give your truck a bit more ground clearance when casing jumps or even when flat landing. And lastly- they have a lot of rotating mass, making it easier to pull back and front flips.

3. A truck with a metal chassis. You can always un-taco a metal chassis, a plastic unit will simply snap (and changing out any type of chassis takes forever).

Of the trucks listed in your email neither the Firestorm nor Rustler have a metal chassis. The MT4 and Savage are both good choices and are easy to go huge with because of their big power and 4wd. The 2wd Granite saves some cash up front, which might be something to think about considering how many parts you’ll be buying in the near future.

Peace and love, and be sure to shoot us another email (with pics!) to let us know what you ended up buying.


“You are such a moran, in the last Cub Report I can’t believe you said that only noobies drive Traxxas. I know lots of people that drive Traxxas and all of them have been in the hobby for more than 5 years.

Charlie B.”

Cubby- Yo to the yo Charlie, and thanks for taking the time out of your day to write me 4 separate letters on this one subject (LOL).

I did not say that only noobs drive Traxxas, I said that you’ll look like a noob if you do. I say that because 90% of the noobs we run into at bashes/random parking lots/random parts counters are running Traxxas products. It sounds like you and your crew don’t mind looking like noobs, this is America so to each their own.

But seriously…. even if we might look like noobs, our bash crew does drive a couple of different TRX products on a regular basis. We are big fans of the Slash 4×4 and the E-Revo so they get a fair amount of mileage when we bash. Drive whatever you want, that’s what we do, and remember part of the reason THE Cub Report exists is to simply get people like you riled up.


Want your letter on our front page? Want to win some free stuff? Shoot me your emails, Cubby at BigSquidRC.com. If, and I highly doubt it ever will, your email hits the big time you’ll win a free sticker pack. And if, and I really super highly doubt it ever will, your letter is named “Letter of the Month” (like Alan’s this month), we’ll even shoot ya out a free t-shirt.

YOUR Cub Reporter

ASK Cubby

“My first

Hi my name is Anthony. I’m looking to get a RTR RC truck. I’m into electric RC trucks and so far the only 2 I like are the hpi savage flux hp and the TT mt3 3G. Is there any RC you can recommend and is there anything you can say to make the choice easier between either RC that I have interest in? Like is the savage flux really waterproof? I’m new to this so I’ve read a lot of blogs and reviews including from your web site but there are so many RC to choose from.

Anthony T.”

Cubby- Yo hey Anthony, hit Brian up with your snail mail so he can get a BSRC sticker pack headed out your way.

So… yet another “which should I get” email, this time between the Thunder Tiger MT4 G3 and the HPI Savage Flux. So where do I stand on the two trucks???

I’m personally a big fan of the Thunder Tiger. Why? It has rip the tires off power, it has a layout that is easy to work on, and it rarely breaks in such a way that the truck can’t be driven. We use a number of the Thunder Tigers to put on driving demos and its one of our favorites. We can bash the heck out of them for an entire weekend, and while they might be all twisted and tweaked afterwards, they are still driving. Oh and, they are typically a little easier on the wallet up front.

However, we do have other members of our Bash Crew that would select the Savage. It has big power, arguably more than the Thunder Tiger, and once you have it dialed in is known for being one of the toughest trucks out there. As far as waterproofing goes, as far as I know they are not waterproof, but that doesn’t mean you can’t do a little work yourself and make it that way.


“Cubby,
I have been looking all over the web for a positive review of the Octane Savage, so far I have found none. Can you give me one good reason to buy the truck?
Kyle V.”

Cubby Ok, let me get this straight, you are emailing me, me (?????), to get one good reason to buy an HPI Savage Octane? You do know I hate gas/nitro more than being stuck behind a woman applying for a home loan at an ATM, right?

Ya, I am seriously an electric guy. I dig they are quiet so I never get run off a bash spot, I dig their ridiculous torque, and I dig that they either start every single time, or go up in flames, no in-between.

However… I actually have two good reasons for you to buy the Octane- 1. it’s a game changer, and 2. it’s great for people who like a challenge.

Now… it might not be a very good truck, but neither were a bunch of other ground breakers. Shall we remember the original T-Maxx? Holy smokes, how many times did I see a guy that couldn’t get his to start? How many times did I see guys with fubared one way bearings in the starter? How many dead “quick start’ batteries did I see go dead after constant cranking? How many times did I see guys finally get their T-Maxx started, drop it on the ground, to only have it die when their first foot hit the drivers stand? How many times did I see a runaway T-Maxx going 40 mph across a parking lot with its overweight owner chasing it like he was Usain Bolt? Ya, the original T-Maxx, the biggest seller in the history of rc, was no real gem of a truck.

Hey, how about the original Losi Mini-T? Remember the friction super bounce shocks? Remember the poor range? Remember the non-standard servo wire? Remember how its servo was so slow you could measure its transit speed with a sun dial? Out of the box it wasn’t kick’n any ass.

Or how about the almighty Slash? Remember how the shocks exploded the first big jump you landed? Remember how easy it was to polish the teeth off the spur, even with the stock brushed motor?

Those trucks were all huge trend setters, and I swear a big part of their allure was the fact they were not perfect out of the box.

Enter the aftermarket, companies that took ground breaking trucks and actually transformed them into something you could actually drive. Remember all the dozens upon dozens of aftermarket companies that sprung up with T-Maxx hop-up and bling parts? Remember the same about the Mini-T?

What I’m trying to say here is the Octane is not perfect out of the box, far from it, but there are a whole lot of hardcore hobbyists that actually prefer trucks that need some innovative thinking to finally get them up to their full potential. If you are the type of person that liked the challenge of making the T-Maxx or Mini-T into full tilt bash machines, I would say you need to hop on the Octane bandwagon ASAP.


That’s all I have for ya this week. Keep those letters coming in, my email is Cubby at BigSquidRC.com. Each and every letter that hits the big time gets a free sticker pack, if I proclaim yours as letter of the month we’ll totally hook you up with one of our sweet new BSRC t-shirts.

YOUR Cub Reporter