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Well, here is something we don’t do everyday, and unboxing VIDEO. On top of that, it’s a BATTERY unboxing video! Why in the world would we do that? Well, we aren’t going to spoil this one, you’ll need to watch and see for yourself. Dont’ worry.. it’s short.

Hit THIS link for more information on the official MaxAmps website.

Looking for more MaxAmps product news? THIS is the link you want.

Unboxing Losi Mini 8IGHT-T Truggy
A few weeks ago during our California Road Trip we first got the chance to pull trigger time on the latest mini from Losi, the Mini 8IGHT-T Truggy. We had a blast driving it around with the Losi crew and couldn’t wait to get our hands on one for a full review.

When we did get our review truck we took some pictures to show you what it looks like to crack the box open. Inside you’ll find the truck, a Spektrum transmitter, a manual, along with batteries and everything you need to get it running. Enjoy the 3 galleries of unboxing pictures below, we are busy working on the full review which goes up on our front page about two weeks from now. If you are interested in the Mini 8IGHT-T, Here Is The Link to its official product page over on Losi’s website.

Find more unboxings at This Link on BigSquidRC.

High Speed ECX 4WD Circuit
While we’ve had a fantastic time bashing the ECX 4WD Circuit at the local park, it does come with brushed power that isn’t very fast. Like most people, we are always longing for more speed, therefore we decided to do a few modifications to see what it would take to break the speed limit. Hit the READ MORE to see what we did to get some serious speed out of the 4wd Circuit, and watch the video.

READ MORE

lst_xxl_2_box1

We finally got around to digging our Losi LST XXL 2 Gas truck out of the box, and it is a beast! Coming hot on the heals of another recently released gas truck, we are really looking forward to bashing the heck out of this thing, and seeing what that .31 gas engine can do!

As you can see it came with the oil mix for the fuel, the roto-start, some tools, a lipo battery for the truck, and a Spektrum DX2E Transmitter.

Our full review of the LST XXL 2 will be posted soon. Check out all the unboxing pictures below, and for more information click This Link over on the official LOSI website for details.

Hit the READ MORE button for all the photos!
READ MORE

Build Title Pic[To start from the beginning, check out Part 1 and Part 2]

The frames are built and the motors and ESCs are installed, and all that remains is one major piece: The Multirotor Control Board.

The Multirotor Control Board is the heart and soul of the multirotor vehicle. It maintains level flight, helps equalize motor speeds, and also is the gyroscope for the aircraft. Now these boards use a number of programming means: some use computer code to get set up,  others just a basic computer setup program, and some can be completely standalone. The only disadvantage? The price varies just as much as the capabilities of the control board. I picked up a little bit of everything for these quads, so I left no stone unturned.

Multirotor Control Boards:

Armattan CNC 258 VTail: This quad actually was designed with hardware to support the installation of a specific control board, the KK Multiboard. Available from various sources, though originating from HobbyKing the KK board is the go-to control board for most DIY multirotor builders. Priced around $39 shipped, this control board has an onboard LCD display and menu system to fine tune the settings. With its simple setup and reliable performance, I can understand why it is always on backorder. The disadvantage? Backordering, and the fact is ships from China. I can be quite impatient, so sometimes waiting is not worth the value. [Note 5/22/14: For those of you looking for a more 'Made in USA' KK board, ReadyToFlyQuads now has one available for purchase here.)

Lynxmotion Hunter 400: For this quadcopter I really got adventurous and went to my new source for multicontroller boards: ReadyToFlyQuads. Featured on a post from a while ago (found here), the guys there in Florida have made a great board called the MultiWii FLIP. With the gyro and accelerometer technology used originally for the Nintendo Wii controllers, the boards are programmed to handle multirotors using a programming language called Arduino. Yes, this does fall under the ‘Age of the Geek’ category, but all of the coding is premade and the FLIP board can also be purchased with all the programming pre-loaded. For a faster ship, you can order the board without programming and requiring the headers (ESC/Receiver Plugs) to be soldered, and get it to your door for around $20 shipped. I only recommend this board for the ‘tinkering’ kind of DIY builder, for you have a lot of tweaking available through the MultiWiiConf board utility program, shown below.

DJI Flamewheel 450: For this quadcopter I took the more traditional route by buying more DJI, more specifically the Naza-M Lite Controller with GPS unit. This is a basic multicontroller unit that was built with great instructions and support from the manufacturer. The GPS upgrade alone is the same as the GPS and controller bundled together, so I picked up the set for $169 from Empire RC. Granted it is much more expensive than the other two controllers, but the technology is backed but multiple sources of technical support as well as an ever changing firmware set that can be upgraded by connecting the whole thing to the computer. Overall, this was the only setup I had that was pretty straight forward without making me taking much risk in the ‘I hope this setup works or I will have a big crash to clean up.’

Now that the major ‘guts’ of the quadcopters present and accounted for, it’s time to update the scoreboard:

Quad Frame Motor/ESC/Wiring Controller TBA Total
Armattan $125 $129 $39 $0 $293
Lynxmotion $90 $157 $20 $0 $267
DJI $32 $122 $169 $0 $323

Looking back to Part 2 (link at beginning of article), the tables have turned when it comes to pricing, placing the DJI at the high end of the kits where it was at the lowest, thanks to the Naza-M Lite.

It’s time to assemble and pick up the last components, which will wrap up this build series with ‘Prop Up or Shut Up’. It will focus on the finished product, flight, and basic tricks to get your builds running smoothly.

I can’t wait to show you how these guys fly, but until then Stay Shiny and Keep Flyin’!

Unboxing ECX Circuit 4wd 4x4
The ECX line-up has become quite popular among the bashing crowd, and the Circuit 4wd is yet another affordable bash machine from them. While we were unboxing our review ECX Circuit 4wd we took some pictures to show you exactly what it looks like inside the box.

The Circuit 4×4 is a RTR stadium style truck that comes with everything you need right in the box. You can see in the pictures it comes with the AA batteries needed for the transmitter, as well as a wall charger and 6 cell NiMH pack already mounted in the battery tray.

Our full review of the Circuit 4wd gets posted later next week, until then please check out the unboxing pictures, and you can hit up This Link over on the official ECX website for full details on the truck.

Thank Goodness It’s Friday! Click Here for a TGIF mystery link!

hpi_savage_xl_octane_02

It’s time to unbox the HPI Savage XL Octane! The world has been waiting almost three years for this moment, and it’s finally arrived! We are looking forward to hearing this thing purr.

Couple of quick notes, it feels pretty heavy, the roll cage looks cool without the body on, and honestly for the $960 we just spent, a foam or rubber steering grip on the transmitter would of been nice. Plastic, really?

Enjoy the pictures, there are a bunch! So make sure to hit the READ MORE button to see them all.

Go see the rest of the pictures:
READ MORE

Duratrax 3.8 Hatchet MT Tires
There was one tire that stood out after the announcement of Duratrax’s new 3.8 Monster Truck Tire line-up, the Hatchet MT. You see, the Hatchet uses a scale inspired chevron style tread that looks like the tires on a full size monster truck, and they should do a great job of shoveling mud/dirt/gravel while out bashing. Luckily it wasn’t long and we had a set for testing in our hands.

We received the pre-mounted version of the Hatchet MT on chrome wheels. They come packaged like most tires today, in re-sealable plastic bag, and the wheels/tires were pre-glued and ready to be mounted to a vehicle. We are big fans of pre-mounted wheels/tires because of how much time they save, we would rather by bashing than gluing. Also, we’ve found that the Hatchet MTs are some big beefy tires. When placed next to a stock tire off a Thunder Tiger MT4-G3, they are slightly shorter, but much wider, and with very deep tread.

We’ve already been bashing with the Hatchet MTs, but our full review is still a few weeks away. To get full details on the Hatchet MTs, plus all the other 3.8″ monster truck tires that Duratrax makes, simply hit up This Link.

Click Here for a BigSquidRC TGIF Bunny Powered Mystery Link.

axial_deadbold_rtr_01

It was time to break open the new Axial SCX10 Deadbolt RTR! People were such big fans of the Deadbolt body on the AX10, Axial decided to bring the scale look to the SCX10 as well! The green is REALLY green. When we first saw the parts tree, we thought.. ‘Hey! This was supposed to be a RTR!’ But it’s loaded with cool options like the different heads, etc.

You can see a cool shot of the ESC with jumpers for changing the amount of drag brake, as well as a lipo cutoff. It’s nice to have these options in the field made simple just by changing a jumper.

The part number for this SCX10 Deadbolt RTR is #AX90044, it has a street price of $299, should be available shortly after we posted this. More information is available on the Axial Website.

To find more Axial news on BigSquidRC This Is The Link you want, or if you want to check out our Axial Deadbolt AX10 Review you can hit that link.

ECX Torment 4x4 unboxing
Our full review of the ECX Torment 4wd SCT comes up later this week so it’s time for us to post the unboxing pictures. Take a look at the pictures below to see exactly what it looks like to crack the box open on a brand new Torment 4wd.

After we opened the box, we noticed that everything you need to get going is included. It comes with AAs for the transmitter, a charger, and the pack for the truck is already mounted in the battery tray. As you can see from the pictures, our test unit looked great right out of the box, but I can assure you it has been tested very hard since then. Look for our full review Thursday or Friday to find out if the Torment 4wd is a bash worthy machine.

To get more information on the Torment 4×4 simply click This Link to jump over to the official ECX website. You can also Click Right Here to view more unboxings right here on BigSquidRC.

Build Title PicPart 1 of the Mega Multirotor build can be found Right Here.

The frames are built, and now it is time to get the right motors and speed controllers for each of our three multirotor setups. Don’t be afraid, with every kit/frame there is available for purchase there are always suggested motor and speed controller combos that go well with that particular frame. Even easier, theses combos can be purchased with the frame company to take out the legwork in finding the perfect match, but normally that adds a leg (or at least an arm) to the price.

I did all my shopping a la carte, so ideally this should cut down on costs, which we will sum up at the end of each part of the series. Let’s start with motors and finish with ESCs.


Motors:

As I stated, motors are usually suggested by the manufacturer of the frame. Now these are only suggestions; you can install any size motor you want, but going smaller risks labored performance of the multirotor aircraft, and bigger motors may have large power or ESC requirements.

Lynxmotion 400: In this case a 2830 (28mm stator diameter, 30mm length respectively), was suggested so I was able to acquire 4 11-turn, 1000kv motors from Turnigy (via eBay), with a maximum draw of 22amps (more on why that matters in a minute). All four motors shipped cost $84.

Armattan 258 V-Tail: This quadcopter was by far the smallest of the 3 frames, so this frame required the small 2208 motor (22mm diameter, 8mm length). I picked up Suppo 2208 14-turn, 1450 kv motors from RCPlaneBuilder. These motors have a maximum draw of 14amps, and cost $62 after shipping

DJI Flamewheel 450: This frame was a little more open for interpretation for required motors, so I picked a midrange size: 2212 (22mm diameter, 12mm length). I also relied on RCPlaneBuilder and acquired more Suppo motors, this time 2212 10-turn, 1400kv. These have a maximum draw of 14.5 amps, and only cost a little more than the 2208 with $66 after shipping.

Speed Controllers (ESCs):

The ESC is the barrier between battery and motor, giving us the power to control all that is the multirotor. Most important is that there must be a fast response between Transmitter and/or Multicontrol board (gyro). With that in mind, we need a more responsive ESC, which is found in flashed ESCs. Like updating a program or hardware on the computer, an ESC is flashed to update to a faster data transfer rate as well as modify various settings. The most common firmware programming set is called SimonK. This is the common programming in all the ESCs I acquired.

When it comes to choosing the amperage of your ESC, we refer back to our motors. The standard rule I’ve come to live by is round the maximum amperage of the motor to the nearest 10, and that’s a good ESC for your purposes without frying/overheating anything. So if the max amperage of a motor is 14amps, then a 20amp or higher ESC is sufficient.

Lynxmotion 400: With the maximum draw of 22amps for the Turnigy motors, I needed 30amp ESC which I found from BuddyRC. The DYS SimonK Multirotor 30A ESC was a perfect fit and reached me for about $66 shipped.

Armattan 258 V-Tail: The current draw of the 2208 motors only requires a 20amp ESC, but I decided to get adventurous (READ: shipping error). I picked up Afro 30A ESCs from -Redacted- for $62.

DJI Flamewheel 450: 14.5amps would required 20amp ESCs like the Armattan, and this time I did pick up the right ESCs. For this quad I also purchased Afro 20A ESCs from -Redacted- for $56.

At this point, it’s all just assembly for these electronics (soldering may or may not be required depending on the motor/ESC). Don’t forget your power distribution for each quad. The DJI Flamewheel has an integrated distribution board, so all I needed was a whip with a battery plug (Eflite EC3 Device Whip, $4). For the Lynxmotion 400 I soldered up a power distribution wire set with 3.5mm and a battery plug I had laying around (about $7). The Armattan was a perfect setup for a Turnigy Power Distribution Board w/ XT-60 plug I bought for $5. Below you will find pictures of the motors, ESCs, and some snippets of their install for some of the quadcopters.

 

 

Running Totals:

Quad Frame Motor/ESC/Wiring TBA TBA Total
Armattan $125 $129 $0 $0 $254
Lynxmotion $90 $157 $0 $0 $247
DJI $32 $122 $0 $0 $154

 

 

 

And with that, we are one major component away from having the electronics complete, which leads us to the title of the next installment: ‘If I Only Had a Brain

Until then, Stay Shiny and Keep Flyin’!

 

HPI Micro RS4 Box Side 2

Just this past week HPI Racing released another Micro RS4, this time the black Mustang of Vaughn Gittin, Jr. This kit, like its Sprint2 brother, has both soft and drift tires in the box, and I cannot wait to test my hand in drifting! I hope to have some video up soon, but for now here are some nice unboxing images!

More information on the Micro RS4 Vaughn Gittin Jr Mustang can be found on the HPI Website.

For more BigSquidRC news on HPI Racing, click here.

Team Durango DEX210v2 Unboxing
Team Durango, the relatively young company known for their high end race machines, recently announced their latest weapon for the 2wd buggy class, the DEX210v2. We recently got one in our hands, as we cracked it open we took pictures to show you what it looks like inside the box. The 210v2 is a kit, so inside you’ll find multiple bags filled with parts, a nice looking aluminum chassis, wheels, and a clear body/wing. All the part bags are clearly labeled, and after thumbing through the manual, it looks clearly written with sharp images to make the build easier.

We are almost done building the 210v2, look for our full review in about 2 weeks. We won’t be racing the buggy, instead we’ll be giving it the full basher treatment to see if it can be used outside a track just for fun. We will be building it in a mid-motor configuration to keep from destroying any motors on those big rear end landings, and in the last picture below you can see the Duratrax tires and TrakPower shorty LiPo that we selected to run in the buggy. Click Right Here to get full information on the 210v2 over on the official Durango website.

Can’t get enough unboxings? Get more at This Link on BigSquidRC.