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Posts Tagged ‘spektrum

THE Losi XXX-SCB Brushless RTR Review from Horizon Hobby

Losi XXX-SCB Brushless Review

Back in 2011 Losi introduced the first RTR XXX-SCB. It looked like nothing else on the market and was a solid RTR. Now Losi has added brushless power and their AVC Stabilty Control. Is the new XXX-SCB a good basher? Does it have enough power to keep your interest? Is it worth your hard earned cash? Hit the “Read More” to see what we found out during our testing of the brushless XXX-SCB…

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Losi XXX-SCT Brushless RTRFor all you power hungry bashers out there Losi has announced a brushless version of their popular XXX-SCT short course truck. The truck not only features a powerful 3300kV brushless motor, but also comes with their AVC stability system to make sure you can put all that power to the ground. A Spektrum 2.4GHz radio system is used for glitch free performance and all the electronics are waterproof to make sure the fun doesn’t end when the going gets wet.

* Includes 7.4v 3000mAh hard case LiPo battery and charger
* Highly detailed body with realistic bumpers
* 45 amp ESC
* High torque digital servo

The brushless XXX-SCT has a street price of $349 and a part number of #LOS03002. Click Right Here for more details over on Losi’s official website.

Get more Losi news Right Here on BigSquidRC.

AVC BasicsSince we first got our hands on AVC Stability Control we have found it an invaluable tool for making our trucks easier to drive. Today we’ll be doing a short tutorial on what parts and pieces that it takes to put AVC in your truck. In later installments we’ll go over how to calibrate and install the AVC system, as well as how to fine tune it to your needs.

Why do we use AVC in our bash trucks? We don’t normally use it in high traction conditions, however, when the going gets slick we dial up the AVC. Stability control helps keep our over powered bash trucks from constantly spinning out when we get on the gas. With the AVC dialed up we can get on the gas harder coming out of corners and it can help us drive a straighter line when pounding the gas on a straightaway.

What vehicles can you install AVC in? All types really, from that electric Losi Mini-T of yours all the way to an HPI 5B gas buggy, AVC can work in them all. Short course, drag cars, buggies, truggies, whatever you might have, AVC can make them easier to drive.

Exactly what is needed to put AVC stability control in your truck?

1. The “brain” of the AVC stability control is the receiver, therefore you’ll need a Spektrum 4210 receiver.

2. A DSM2 Spektrum transmitter. Because the brain of the AVC control is in the receiver, you’ll need a transmitter that will bind to it.

3. Digital servos. The AVC technology only works with digital servos, so if you are running an electric car you’ll need a digital steering servo, if your install is in a nitro or gas car, you’ll need digital steering and throttle servos. Does it matter which brand? We’ve used AVC with Spektrum, Futaba, Hitec, Savox, and Xpert digital servos without issue.

That’s it! In our next installment we’ll walk you through an actual install and set-up process of an AVC system in our review Pro-line PRO-MT. Want more AVC information right now? Check out This Link over on the official Spektrum website.

Want more AVC information on BigSquidRC? This Is The Link you want.

THE Losi Mini 8IGHT-T Truggy From Horizon Hobby Review

Losi Mini 8IGHT-T Truggy Review

In today’s review we’ll be taking a very up close and personal look at the Mini 8IGHT-T Truggy from Losi. The Mini 8IGHT-T comes in at 1/14 scale, bigger than most minis, but significantly smaller than a tenth scaled truck. It comes brushless powered and with the high zoot AVC that everyone is talking about. Can the Mini 8IGHT-T take the beating required to be a good bash vehicle? Is it worth its $279 price point? Is there enough yank under the hood to keep a smile on your face? Hit the “Read More” to find out…

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THE Losi LST XXL-2 4WD Gasoline Monster Truck Review

Losi LST XXL-2 Review

Hype, hype, and more hype, that has been the name of the gas game so far. The first offering, the HPI Octane, seemed to come up a bit short of all the promises. Hit the “Read More” button below to read our review of the second gas burner to hit the market, the Losi LST XXL-2 Monster Truck. Does it have enough power to be fun? Does it easily start every single time? Do you have to constantly tune it? Is it worth your hard earned cash? Make the jump to find out…

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THE ECX Circuit 4WD RTR Review

ECX Circuit 4wd Review

Myself, like many of you, spent years driving 2wd Stadium Trucks. They were a whole lot easier to drive and bash with compared to a typical 2wd buggy. A 4wd stadium truck would have been even better, but there were very few available, and those that were tended to break all the time.

ECX recently released their all wheel drive stadium truck, the ready to run 4wd Circuit. Does the Circuit make a good basher? Can it get around the track? Does it have enough power to be fun? And most importantly, is it worth your hard earned cash? Find out by hitting the “Read More” button below…

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THE ECX Torment 4wd RTR SCT Review

ECX Torment 4wd SCT Review

ECX, while still a relatively “new” brand, has made quite the splash in the bashing market. Their original 2wd Torment short course truck proved to be a capable bash machine, as well as several other vehicles in their line-up. We’ve been driving one of their new 4wd Torment RTR SCTs for a few weeks to see how it stacks up. Is the 4wd worth the extra cash? How does it stack up to one of the toughest fields in all of rc (4wd SCT)? Can the new 4wd platform take a hit without breaking? Hit the “Read More” to find out…

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Vaterra Rockstar Ford Fiesta Rally Car
What is the latest off-road release from Vaterra? It is their Rockstar Energy Ford Fiesta RallyCross car. The Rockstar is a tenth scale, brushless powered, 4wd, sitting on the platform you might recognize from the Halix and Vaterra’s Ford Raptor. It comes dialed with AVC, active vehicle control, and like most other Vaterra products, has a trick looking body for showing off at the local bash spot.

* Metal gear, viscous torque vectoring differentials
* Dynamite 3300Kv 4-pole brushless motor
* Waterproof
* Fully licensed body
* Includes Spektrum DX2E 2.4GHz transmitter

The part number for the Vaterra is #VTR03010, it is priced at $469, and you can get more details after clicking This Link to head over to its official page on the Vaterra website.

Click Right Here to check out more Vaterra posts here on BigSquidRC.

ECX Torment 4x4 unboxing
Our full review of the ECX Torment 4wd SCT comes up later this week so it’s time for us to post the unboxing pictures. Take a look at the pictures below to see exactly what it looks like to crack the box open on a brand new Torment 4wd.

After we opened the box, we noticed that everything you need to get going is included. It comes with AAs for the transmitter, a charger, and the pack for the truck is already mounted in the battery tray. As you can see from the pictures, our test unit looked great right out of the box, but I can assure you it has been tested very hard since then. Look for our full review Thursday or Friday to find out if the Torment 4wd is a bash worthy machine.

To get more information on the Torment 4×4 simply click This Link to jump over to the official ECX website. You can also Click Right Here to view more unboxings right here on BigSquidRC.

Freqeskinz radio skins futaba spektrum
Want to make your transmitter stand out in a crowd? That is easy to do with a skin/wrap from the crew over at Freqeskinz. For all you Futaba 4PL-PLS/4PK-S and Spektrum DX4S/DX4R Pro/DX3R Pro owners, Freqeskinz has some cool new designs so you can have the trickest radio at the local bash spot. The skins are made out of genuine 3M air-release vinyl and are covered with a protective laminate for long life and pristine looks. The skins are easy to apply and can be re-positioned for a perfect install.

The radio skins are priced at $35 and you can check out all the different styles at This Link over on Freqeskinz official website.

Have you read our latest Spektrum radio review? If not, check it out Right Here.

THE Spektrum DX4S 4-Channel DSMR AVC Radio System Review

Spektrum DX4S Review

What’s the real scoop on Spektrum’s new AVC (Active Vehicle Control) system? Does it work? Can it truly make your car easier to drive? Is it just another marketing gimmick? Has range improved with the newer Spektrum products? We’ve been driving, testing, and beating on a Spektrum DX4S for weeks now and we learned a lot about it. To find out exactly what we learned, and to get the answers to all the questions above, hit the “Read More” button to get this party started…

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ASK Cubby

“Spektrum dsmr

Will you be reviewing any of the new Spektrum radios coming out? I’m interested to see if the new dsmr modulation has better range than its predecessors.

Thanks, Jonathan”

Cubby- Heyyyyy now Jon, congrats on making our front page, be sure to hit Brian up for a free sticker pack. We’ve even got some new stickers, really tiny ones that work great on smaller scale vehicles and quads. Hopefully one day we’ll get’em posted in our BSRC shop.

First off- we have definitely noticed that the range on the RTR vehicles that we’ve tested with Spektrum is muchhhhhh longer than before. The Vaterra Halix is a good example, it has at least twice the range of earlier Spektrum systems. A few weeks ago one of our reviewers Hawaiian Chris had to make a couple walks of shame to get back in range of his older Spektrum radio, but he could basically drive as far away as he wanted to with the Halix and still had perfect control. Thankfully, after all this time, it appears Spektrum has their range issues figured out.

Secondly- yes, we’ve got a review for the DX4S with AVC coming up next week. And yes, we’ve noticed very good range on it as well. We’ll be actually measuring its range this weekend, look for the measurement in the review.


“Viper vx4

Hey my name is Jeff. I’m a basher from St.Louis. Was wondering if you have a store locally to me. I read on your review of vx4 that you bashed it in Collinsville was hoping you had a store, let me know if you do. Would like to get a good store to buy my parts for my customers. Repairs (been burnt bad by my local favorite) and want to find new favorite thanks for your time.

Stampede with viper vx4.

Jeff H.”

Cubby- Interesting email there Jeffery, I have no idea what you were getting at so I’ll just ramble for a while….

First off, there are a couple of good hobby shops in the STL. Checkered Flag Hobbies is located in the southern metro, while a shop called Mark Twain is a solid shop in the north just off I-70. Both carry decent inventories and have knowledgeable sales staffs. Both are also HRP dealers, meaning they have access to all the Viper goodies that you might want.

Btw, for all you local Chi-Town and STL bashers, we are working on a type of calender so you’ll know where we are on the weekends so you can meet up and bash with us, but like most other projects, there is so much to do, and so little time.


Congrats, you made it through another “ASK Cubby”, why not get even crazier and shoot me an email. Cubby at BigSquidRC.com is the addy you need, if your letter hits the big time you will get free stickers or maybe even a t-shirt.

YOUR Cub Reporter

Blade Nano QX dodging hangar queenAs I enjoy this heat wave in the Midwest (50 degrees, anyone?), I realized something. Never in my short time writing Raging Rotors have I discussed really what kind of ‘path’ one can take to become a competent RC Pilot. Well, better late than never! Over the next couple of articles, we will discuss steps to take to improve your skills and your tech to increase your pilot ‘street cred’. For you experienced RC Pilots, feel free to comment if you have any suggestions. RC is first and foremost a learning experience, so share your knowledge!

Hot Sauce's DX7sI’m a big fan of dedication. Many of you are likely looking into RC helicopters after putzing around with something already, whether a basic coaxial helicopter or one of the almost dozen basic quadcopters that have found their way to market in the last 18 months. If you are dead serious about getting into flying RC helicopters and multirotors, I would start by investing in a computerized radio. A computerized radio is more than your regular transmitter with trim buttons and gimbals, but one that not only (usually) has multiple model memory and a means of finite manipulation of specific flight channels (throttle, aileron, etc). For you Blade and E-Flite fans I’m talking minimally a Spektrum DX6 and JR Radios or for the Heli-max and Flyzone fans there are Futaba and Tactic radio systems. I flew my Blade Nano CPx on the stock non-computerized radio and also on a few different computerized radios, and there is a world of difference between the two. The primary difference is in the response to input: a computerized radio input provides almost instantaneous response in the aircraft. I was actually selling this concept to a coworker who flies one of the quads I own in an RTF format, and I had him fly mine on my Spektrum DX7s. Granted a baseline Spektrum DX6i is $140 and a Tactic TTX650 is $150, but I would not recommend this without the investment being worth it.

Next time on Raging Rotors: …Actually, I’m just going to spoil the title and leave the rest up to your imagination. Part 2 is ‘Pucker up, Buttercup!’

As always, feel free to leave comments about your experiences or ask me anything via kevin (at) bigsquidrc.com, but until next week, Stay Shiny and Keep Flyin’!